Behringer B-2 Pro Review / Test

Today we're looking at a "higher end" microphone from the budget company Behringer; the Behringer B-2 Pro

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 10:30. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $150.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Hardshell Storage Box

  2. Microphone

  3. Shockmount (Includes: 5/8" & 3/8" adapter)

  4. Foam Windscreen

  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Bidirectional

  3. Sensitivity: -37dB to -34dB

  4. Max SPL: 137 / 149dB

  5. Equivalent Noise: 16-18dBA

  6. Impedance: <100-ohms

  7. Power Requirement: +48v

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels fairly average for mics in the $100 price range. It has an all metal body as well as a somewhat flimsy feeling metal mesh grill. On the front you will find a 3-way polar pattern selection switch to move between the cardioid, omnidirectional, and bi-directional polar patterns. On the rear you'll find the high-pass switch that rolls off at 6dB/octave at 150Hz, as well as a -10dB pad if you're recording loud sound sources. 

The frequency response is listed as 20Hz - 20kHz. We're only going to focus on the cardioid polar pattern response here as it's the most used pattern. It has a surprisingly flat response from 1kHz and below with a slight roll off beginning at 150Hz, which reaches -2dB by 50Hz. From 1kHz and up there's a gradual boost that hits +2dB at 7kHz, and then there's a large boost which reaches +5dB at 10kHz and gradually rolls off until it hits 0dB at 20kHz.

The overall performance here was decent. On the electric guitar, the low end felt a little loose, but did not get muddy, and then the treble air boost provided a nice amount of liveliness to the recording. The acoustic guitar sounded too focused in the high end, and left the strings resonance sounding dominating and a bit of a grating tone all around. For singing, the mic added a breathy quality to the voice as well as a bit of extra grit. For spoken word, I think the high end is a detriment to the microphone as it accentuates mouth noises, breathe, and sibilance a bit too much.

Pros

  • Relatively flat low mids and lows

  • All polar patterns are pretty usable (Rare in this price range)

  • Nice build quality

  • Plenty of nice accessories

Cons

  • Shrill in the higher end

  • Susceptible to plosives

  • Relatively high noise floor at 16-18dBA

cardioid
Omni.png
Bi.png

Conclusion

Although this microphone would not be my first choice in any use case, for the price I think it's a pretty good deal. Therefore, if you're looking for your first mic to record music in your home studio, I think this would be a fine option given the plethora of accessories that are provided with the microphone, and the clean and clear tone you can get out of the microphone. Just make sure to pick up a pop filter along with the microphone.  

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Behringer B-2 Pro
US: https://amzn.to/2L3nqAU
UK: https://amzn.to/2zvQRui
CA: https://amzn.to/2N4g29d
DE: https://amzn.to/2uarcC0

 

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Electro Voice RE27 N/D Broadcast Dynamic Mic Review

Today I have finally completed the Electro Voice expansion of Pokemon: Mic Edition. We're looking at the last mic in their RE-series of mics, which just so happens to be the most expensive of the three; the RE27 N/D.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 12:30. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $150.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Hardshell Storage Box

  2. Microphone

  3. Microphone Mount (Includes: 5/8" & 3/8" adapter)

  4. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 45Hz - 20kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-52dB

  4. Impedance: 150-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic is on par with all of EV's other mics that I've tested; excellent. It has a steel body and a nice metal mesh grill. Along the side there are vents that allow for the Variable D technology that helps keep the proximity effect in check. It weighs in at 1 pound 9 oz, so it is a pretty heavy microphone as well. Near the bottom of the mic it has 3 switches that cut portions of the frequency response. 1st is a 6dB cut at 250Hz, 2nd is a 12dB cut at 1000Hz, and 3rd is a 3dB cut of the presence and treble boost. Lastly there is an XLR port on the back of the microphone.

The frequency response is listed as 45Hz - 20kHz. In the neutral mode this microphone has a relatively flat frequency response from 1khz and below, but above that there is a drastic boost that peaks at +7dB above the mids. There are two peaks at 4kHz and 6kHz and then it rolls off the remainder of the treble and air after that. I found the only really usable setting for spoken word was to enable the high cut, and leave the other switches alone. 

The overall performance of this mic was a bit of a shock initially. When I pulled it out of the box a month ago and plugged it in, I almost sent it right back. With the neutral settings it is very harsh, shrill, and forward in the higher frequency range. Once I enabled the high cut though the tone become MUCH better and actually enjoyable to listen to. It also does a great job at off axis rejection and rear rejection, but it should be noted that the off axis coloration is very honky, and terrible sounding.

Pros

  • Slightly higher output than other dynamics due to Neodymium magnet

  • Handles processing well

  • Great job at off axis and rear rejection

  • Great build quality

Cons

  • In neutral mode, the mic sounds bad

  • The low cuts are a bit too drastic

  • Off axis coloration is bad

freq.png
polar.png

Conclusion

For electric guitar, acoustic guitar, and singing I did not enjoy this microphone much at all. It simply is not a tone that I would look to use in those applications. For spoke word however, I found it rather enjoyable when you have the high cut enabled and get relatively close to the microphone. If you're looking for a bright & smooth microphone for podcasting and radio broadcasting, I think this will be a great option, but just make sure to cut those highs and use proper microphone technique.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Electro Voice RE27 ND
US: https://amzn.to/2lQoZaz
UK: N/A
CA: N/A
DE: https://amzn.to/2MHkqdN

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Beyerdynamic M88TG Dynamic Mic Review

Today we're looking at another handheld dynamic microphone from Beyerdynamic, but this time it's a hypercardioid mic, and it is the M88TG.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 2:30. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $350.00 - $400.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Carrying/Storage Pouch

  2. Microphone

  3. Microphone Mount (5/8" & 3/8" threading)

  4. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 30Hz - 20kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Hyper-Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-51dB

  4. Impedance: 200-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels very beefy. It has an all metal body which has some substantial weight to it. Additionally, the metal grill is a tank. Most of the time when I squeeze the grill, there's some give to it, but this held firm. There are no features on this mic, but on the bottom you will find the XLR port. 

The frequency response is listed as 30Hz - 20kHz. This has a minor roll off beginning at 150Hz. The low-mids are flat until you hit 1kHz where it begins to boost, reaching a max of 4dB at 2.5kHz. There is a .5dB cut at 5kHz (+3.5dB) and a 1dB boost at 6.5kHz (+6dB) And then there is a gradual roll off until 20khz.

The overall performance of this mic is great for voice. Being that this has a broader and less dramatic boost in the top end, it yields a much smoother and even sound than many other handheld dynamic microphones. On electric and acoustic, I found the microphone underwhelming with a bit of a honky sound to it, and a little bit of mud in the low end. Additionally, the microphone did excellent at background noise rejection, but it was subpar at handling noise and plosive rejection.

Pros

  • Hyper-cardioid great for bg noise rejection, feedback rejection, or bleed.

  • Very smooth sound

  • Pretty healthy output for a dynamic

  • Hefty build quality

Cons

  • Not good at rejection plosives

  • Did a bad job at handling noise rejection

freq.png
polar.png

Conclusion

It's not very surprising this mic was lackluster on guitars, as it is not marketed as a guitar microphone. Beyerdynamic markets this as a Kick Drum, Bass Drum, Vocal, and Woodwind microphone. Speaking of that, on vocals I think that tonally this microphone sounded excellent. The broader boost gave it a smoother sound which made it more pleasant to listen to than most handheld dynamics, and that's why I recommend it for that. If you do plan to pick this microphone up, I believe it is essential to pick up a pop filter, and leave it in a stand or have a very soft touch.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Beyerdynamic M88 TG
US: https://amzn.to/2M0Oykg
UK: https://amzn.to/2tfukv2
CA: https://amzn.to/2t8U6ls
DE: https://amzn.to/2yn94cD

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Sennheiser E935 Handheld Dynamic Mic Review

Today we're looking at a handheld dynamic microphone from Sennheiser, the E935.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 3:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $180.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone

  2. Microphone Mount

  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Adapter

  4. Carrying Pouch

  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 40Hz - 18kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-51dB

  4. Impedance: 350-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels like it was made for the stage. It has a very substantial feel in the hand, with an all metal body, a very sturdy metal mesh grill, and a good amount of weight to it. There are no bells or whistles on this microphone either. It is a just a microphone with an XLR port so you don't screw anything up while you're performing on stage. 

The frequency response is listed as 40Hz - 18kHz. The frequency response on this mic begins to gradually roll off the bass at around 150Hz with a minor .5dB cut beginning at around 500Hz. From 500 Hz up to 1kHz, we see a gradual boost . and then we remain flat up to 2.5kHz at which point we begin another boost of ~ 3.5dB which remains relatively flat from 4kHz - 10kHz. There is a minor peak at 11kHz, and then a roll off that decreases steadily. 

The polar pattern of this mic is standard cardioid. The off axis and rear coloration are not terribly drastic which is a benefit. The main thing I noticed about this mic is how great it did at off-axis rejection. When playing an acoustic guitar a few inches away while singing, you could definitely hear the acoustic, but it was not distracting from the voice at all. 

The overall performance of this mic is excellent for stage use. On the electric guitar, you get some very bright and aggressive tones, as well as a nice bass roll off which cleans up the mix, and makes room for the bass to do it's job. On the acoustic you get a nice full body with plenty of high end attack which sounded very nice. Then on voice for singing the presence and treble boost allow this mic to cut through the mix, and the bass roll off helps tame any proximity effect, handling noise, or plosives. Unfortunately, the presence boost does introduce some minor sibilance issues.

freq.png
polar.png

Pros

  • Excellent performance in regards to handling noise & plosive rejection

  • Great off-axis rejection for a cardioid microphone

  • More extended high end for added clarity

  • Sturdy build quality for stage use

Cons

  • Presence and treble boost lead to S's sounding slightly sharp

Conclusion

For stage use I think this microphone performed excellent, especially for a cardioid microphone. This mics ability to reject plosives (better than most dynamics), avoid handling noise, and tame proximity effect makes this a great mic for venues who cater to artists who do not necessarily have the best microphone technique. If you're a podcaster or let's player who is also concerned with background noise and not afraid of a mic being in your face, I think this thing will do a fine job for you. No matter what use case you are buying this mic though, if you are using this on voice, make sure to pay attention to the sibilance as it is somewhat sensitive in that frequency range and you may need to eq some of that out of your recording. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Sennheiser E935
US: https://amzn.to/2HmBLGU
UK: https://amzn.to/2FbKTvX
CA: https://amzn.to/2Jkld2Q
DE: https://amzn.to/2qOAF0j

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV