Samson C01 XLR Condenser Mic Review

Today we're not looking at another microphone from Samson, the C01.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen), with the input gain set at approximately 12:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back around $75 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Plastic Storage Box
  2. Microphone
  3. Microphone Mount
  4. 5/8" to 3/8" Stand Adapter
  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 40Hz - 18kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Hyper Cardioid
  3. Sensitivity: ~ -33dB
  4. Impedance: 200-ohms
  5. Max SPL: 136dB

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone is perfectly fine given the price. It has an all metal body as well as a sturdy metal mesh grill, and a good amount of weight to it coming in at 1.1 lb. On the front of the microphone you'll find a blue LED light that lights up when phantom power on your interface is turned on and on the bottom you'll find the XLR port. 

The frequency response is listed as 40Hz - 18kHz. The bass frequencies begin to roll off at 150Hz but peak again at around 95Hz before rolling off the remainder of the low frequencies. The mids and presence fluctuate quite a bit with a minor boost around 600-700hz, a peak at around 1.7kHz, 2.7kHz, and 5.5kHz, with a broad boost from 6Khz to 12kHz. 

The polar pattern of this mic is Hyper-cardioid. This means that the front is sensitive and the rear of the mic has a small lobe of sensitivity with the dead spots around 112-degrees. 

The overall performance of this mic lacks. As far as a vocal mic it seems to lack significantly in the low frequencies, sounds a bit nasally, and has some minor sibilance issues as well. On the electric guitar, I had to put the mic right on top of the amp to get some low end in the guitar, but it did end up sounding fairly decent. The acoustic on the other hand sounded brittle in the high end. Something that was not listed on the specifications sheet was the self noise, and when I was testing the mic, it seemed like a fairly big downfall of this mic. Finally, the tone of the mic all around was somewhat harsh and become painful to listen to after lengthy listening sessions. 

Pros

  • Pretty good build quality
  • Comes with a storage box

Cons

  • Subpar performance with self noise
  • Lacks in the low end
  • Sibilance issues
  • Harsh tone that became painful after long listening sessions
C01Freq

Conclusion

I was somewhat let down by this microphone. I have really enjoyed the majority of Samson mics on the market, but this one didn't meet my expectations. The frequency response left a lot to be desired in that it left the voice and guitar sounding thin and harsh. The self noise also makes this unusable for professional applications as well.

Due to how competitive the mic market is, I don't think I can recommend this mic. There are too many mics in this price range for me to recommend a mic that doesn't perform amazingly.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Samson C01
US: https://amzn.to/2JgDkHs
UK: https://amzn.to/2EdQZvt
CA: https://amzn.to/2pZmnJ5
DE: https://amzn.to/2pZZPZu

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

CAD U1000 USB Studio Condenser Mic Review / Test

Today we're reviewing a potato, I mean a microphone from CAD; the CAD U1000. This mic is listed compatible with Windows & Mac.

For the majority of this review, I have connected the mic directly to my mac computer with the computer gain set at ~35%. I have not boosted the audio at all in post, and there is no other post processing completed on the audio.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $40-$80 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Wind Screen
  3. USB to USB cable
  4. Microphone Mount
  5. Desktop Microphone Stand
  6. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Sampling Rate: 44.1kHz
  4. Bit Depth: 16-Bit

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone feels decent. It has an all metal body and a metal grill covering the capsule. On the front of the microphone you will find a blue LED light to indicate that it is receiving power. Directly beneath this, you will find a headphone volume up and down control. Next you'll find a microphone mute button that does not mute the microphone's signal to the computer, but rather mutes the zero latency monitoring. Lastly you will find a 3.5mm headphone port which does offer latency free monitoring.

The frequency response is listed as 20Hz - 20kHz. I do not think this microphone offers any sound worth discussing in depth. It is underwhelming and sounds exactly like you would expect a low end USB mic to sound.

The polar pattern of this mic is listed as cardioid. It did pick up a fair amount of audio as we moved around the microphone, and also picked up a bit of the quiet keyboard that I test while reviewing the mic.

The overall performance of this mic is mediocre at best. As you can tell, throughout the majority of the review (on the mac), there are clipping artifacts in the audio. I demonstrate how no matter what gain I set the mic at, there are clipping artifacts. On the windows machine this issue did not occur. My issue here is that the mic is listed as compatible with Windows and MAC, and just like other CAD mics I've tested, the performance on the MAC computer leaves a LOT to be desired.

Pros

  • Comes with everything you need
  • Fairly quiet preamp
  • Zero latency monitoring
  • Decent build quality

Cons

  • If you get too close to the microphone on a mac, it clips
  • Audio recorded sounds very mediocre

Conclusion

No I do not recommend this microphone, even if you can get it for the discounted $40. I think that the clipping issue on the mac is unacceptable and do not have faith in a company that would release a product like this.

Some of you may be thinking I'm being too harsh, and that this could be attributed to a faulty unit, however, I have tested out two other CAD microphones and experienced very similar issues, and was not able to receive any assistance from the company. For $40, I would suggest looking at something like the Samson Go Mic, and all around better microphone.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy it on Amazon
US: http://amzn.to/2lAwHGU
UK: NA

Tonor USB Tie-clip Mic (SF-911B) Review / Test

Today I am reviewing Tonor USB Tie-Clip / Desktop Microphone (SF-911B). The idea behind this microphone is awesome! A plug and play lavalier/lapel microphone that connects to any Windows or Mac computer through it's USB port. Unfortunately, only the idea of this mic is good.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $10 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone w/ 1.5m USB Cable
  2. Desktop Stand
  3. Windscreen
  4. Carrying Pouch
  5. Directions

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone is very inconsistent. The microphone capsule is encased in metal which gives it a nice sturdy feel and some nice weight. The USB cable is a standard usb cable so there's nothing special there. On the cable a few inches below the mic is a rectangular box that I am assuming contains the circuitry for the USB interface, which I think is placed in a HORRIBLE location. The mic stand feels cheap, but offers some nice options as far as microphone positioning, and it offers some cable management on the bottom side of the stand.

The frequency response of this mic is listed as 100Hz - 16kHz which is pretty nice for a cheap USB mic. It offers decent sound for the voice, but as you would expect, it lacks a bit of presence/high-end when clipped to your shirt.  

The polar pattern of this microphone is omni directional which is standard for lapel microphones. However, for a USB version of this microphone, they should consider offering a Unidirectional model to help eliminate background noise from the keyboard.

When connected to the computer, there was also a HUGE issue with digital noise. No matter what I set my gain at, I could not escape the digital noise that is reminiscent of morse code. Also, when you touch the metal microphone capsule, it seems to cause a short/grounding issue that increases the buzz even more. This could be avoided by adding the windscreen.

Pros

  • Cheap
  • Nice feeling microphone capsule
  • Stand has cable management
  • Plug and play

Cons

  • HORRIBLE digital buzz/hiss no matter what the gain is set to
  • Contact with metal microphone capsule increases buzz issue
  • Poor location for circuitry
  • Signal is quiet

Conclusion

DO NOT BUY THIS MICROPHONE! I do not think that anyone should waste their money on this thing. The idea behind it is great, but the execution was horrible. There's a constant buzz that is only amplified if you make the mistake of touching the microphone capsule. The signal is also fairly quiet which means you will most likely have to crank your gain which will also amplify the digital noise. All around, the USB model of this mic is just not a good option for anyone.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them in the comments on this site or on the youtube channel, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the SF-911B:
US: http://amzn.to/29Gb4LD
UK: http://amzn.to/29HuJvA