Beyerdynamic M88TG Dynamic Mic Review

Today we're looking at another handheld dynamic microphone from Beyerdynamic, but this time it's a hypercardioid mic, and it is the M88TG.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 2:30. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $350.00 - $400.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Carrying/Storage Pouch

  2. Microphone

  3. Microphone Mount (5/8" & 3/8" threading)

  4. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 30Hz - 20kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Hyper-Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-51dB

  4. Impedance: 200-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels very beefy. It has an all metal body which has some substantial weight to it. Additionally, the metal grill is a tank. Most of the time when I squeeze the grill, there's some give to it, but this held firm. There are no features on this mic, but on the bottom you will find the XLR port. 

The frequency response is listed as 30Hz - 20kHz. This has a minor roll off beginning at 150Hz. The low-mids are flat until you hit 1kHz where it begins to boost, reaching a max of 4dB at 2.5kHz. There is a .5dB cut at 5kHz (+3.5dB) and a 1dB boost at 6.5kHz (+6dB) And then there is a gradual roll off until 20khz.

The overall performance of this mic is great for voice. Being that this has a broader and less dramatic boost in the top end, it yields a much smoother and even sound than many other handheld dynamic microphones. On electric and acoustic, I found the microphone underwhelming with a bit of a honky sound to it, and a little bit of mud in the low end. Additionally, the microphone did excellent at background noise rejection, but it was subpar at handling noise and plosive rejection.

Pros

  • Hyper-cardioid great for bg noise rejection, feedback rejection, or bleed.

  • Very smooth sound

  • Pretty healthy output for a dynamic

  • Hefty build quality

Cons

  • Not good at rejection plosives

  • Did a bad job at handling noise rejection

freq.png
polar.png

Conclusion

It's not very surprising this mic was lackluster on guitars, as it is not marketed as a guitar microphone. Beyerdynamic markets this as a Kick Drum, Bass Drum, Vocal, and Woodwind microphone. Speaking of that, on vocals I think that tonally this microphone sounded excellent. The broader boost gave it a smoother sound which made it more pleasant to listen to than most handheld dynamics, and that's why I recommend it for that. If you do plan to pick this microphone up, I believe it is essential to pick up a pop filter, and leave it in a stand or have a very soft touch.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Beyerdynamic M88 TG
US: https://amzn.to/2M0Oykg
UK: https://amzn.to/2tfukv2
CA: https://amzn.to/2t8U6ls
DE: https://amzn.to/2yn94cD

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Beyerdynamic TG V50 Dynamic Mic Review / Test

Today we're looking at the Beyerdynamic TG V50, which I was super excited to test out because I loved the TG V70D so much.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 2:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $80.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Carrying/Storage Pouch

  2. Microphone

  3. Microphone Mount (5/8" & 3/8" threading)

  4. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 50Hz - 17kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-52.5dB

  4. Impedance: 600-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic is the same as almost all handheld dynamic microphones. It has an all metal construction with no features around the body and it has an XLR port on the bottom. There's really nothing more to say about it. 

The frequency response is listed as 50Hz - 17kHz. This has a fairly neutral mids, but it boost rather significantly up until 5kHz, followed by a minor cut, and then an even larger boost up until 9kHz.

The overall performance of this mic is pretty good. For singing, I think this thing really shined. It had great clarity and a nice presence boost to help cut through a mix. For spoken word I thought it worked pretty well but think the plosive and sibilance issue can be an issue. On electric and acoustic guitar, it was a pretty usable tone...it was very aggressive and non-muddy, which could be pretty rad, but it wouldn't be my first choice for that use. 

Pros

  • Plenty of clarity

  • Not much proximity effect

  • Really nice build quality

Cons

  • Didn't do a good job at rejecting plosives

  • Didn't do a good job at rejecting handling noise

  • The boost can be a bit

Conclusion

If you're looking for a live singing microphone, I think it's a great option there. The lack in proximity effect means the singer will not need to have great microphone technique to avoid boominess. However, the plosives will need to be remedied with a windscreen/pop filter, and you'll need to leave it on the stand. For electric and acoustic guitar, it would be fine in a bind, but it would not be my first choice, so I wouldn't buy it just for that. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Beyerdynamic TG V50
US: https://amzn.to/2sGi06X
UK: https://amzn.to/2Hkfdpf
CA: https://amzn.to/2JvjzPE
DE: https://amzn.to/2Jg9mD4

 

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Sennheiser E935 Handheld Dynamic Mic Review

Today we're looking at a handheld dynamic microphone from Sennheiser, the E935.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 3:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $180.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone

  2. Microphone Mount

  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Adapter

  4. Carrying Pouch

  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 40Hz - 18kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-51dB

  4. Impedance: 350-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels like it was made for the stage. It has a very substantial feel in the hand, with an all metal body, a very sturdy metal mesh grill, and a good amount of weight to it. There are no bells or whistles on this microphone either. It is a just a microphone with an XLR port so you don't screw anything up while you're performing on stage. 

The frequency response is listed as 40Hz - 18kHz. The frequency response on this mic begins to gradually roll off the bass at around 150Hz with a minor .5dB cut beginning at around 500Hz. From 500 Hz up to 1kHz, we see a gradual boost . and then we remain flat up to 2.5kHz at which point we begin another boost of ~ 3.5dB which remains relatively flat from 4kHz - 10kHz. There is a minor peak at 11kHz, and then a roll off that decreases steadily. 

The polar pattern of this mic is standard cardioid. The off axis and rear coloration are not terribly drastic which is a benefit. The main thing I noticed about this mic is how great it did at off-axis rejection. When playing an acoustic guitar a few inches away while singing, you could definitely hear the acoustic, but it was not distracting from the voice at all. 

The overall performance of this mic is excellent for stage use. On the electric guitar, you get some very bright and aggressive tones, as well as a nice bass roll off which cleans up the mix, and makes room for the bass to do it's job. On the acoustic you get a nice full body with plenty of high end attack which sounded very nice. Then on voice for singing the presence and treble boost allow this mic to cut through the mix, and the bass roll off helps tame any proximity effect, handling noise, or plosives. Unfortunately, the presence boost does introduce some minor sibilance issues.

freq.png
polar.png

Pros

  • Excellent performance in regards to handling noise & plosive rejection

  • Great off-axis rejection for a cardioid microphone

  • More extended high end for added clarity

  • Sturdy build quality for stage use

Cons

  • Presence and treble boost lead to S's sounding slightly sharp

Conclusion

For stage use I think this microphone performed excellent, especially for a cardioid microphone. This mics ability to reject plosives (better than most dynamics), avoid handling noise, and tame proximity effect makes this a great mic for venues who cater to artists who do not necessarily have the best microphone technique. If you're a podcaster or let's player who is also concerned with background noise and not afraid of a mic being in your face, I think this thing will do a fine job for you. No matter what use case you are buying this mic though, if you are using this on voice, make sure to pay attention to the sibilance as it is somewhat sensitive in that frequency range and you may need to eq some of that out of your recording. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Sennheiser E935
US: https://amzn.to/2HmBLGU
UK: https://amzn.to/2FbKTvX
CA: https://amzn.to/2Jkld2Q
DE: https://amzn.to/2qOAF0j

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Beyerdynamic TG-V70D Dynamic Mic Review

Today we're looking at a handheld dynamic microphone from Beyerdynamic, the TG-V70D.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 2:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $200.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone

  2. Microphone Mount

  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Adapter

  4. Documentation (including frequency response & sensitivity of the actual mic you bought)

  5. Carrying Pouch

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 25Hz - 18kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Hyper-Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: ~-49dB

  4. Impedance: 280-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic is basic but robust. It has a standard tapered metal handle and a sturdy feeling metal mesh grill, which has a good amount of foam on the inside to attempt to reject some plosives. 

The frequency response is listed as 25Hz - 18kHz. The frequency response on this mic begins to gradually roll off the bass at around 250Hz, and then starts a drastic roll off around 150Hz. The low mids are flat, and then in the high mids we start to see a boost beginning at around 1.5kHz. This boost ends up peaking betwen 7-8kHz, and then begins a consistent roll off from 8 -18kHz. 

The polar pattern of this mic is hyper-cardioid. The 90-degree rejection on this mic is great. You have almost no low end, and the volume significantly decreases. When you get around to 180-degrees some low end returns, but the higher frequencies seem to disappear. In the tests I conducted, it did an excellent job at rejecting keyboard noise and acoustic guitar noise when they are in the null spots of the polar pattern. 

The overall performance of this mic is great. On electric guitar you're getting a tight low end without any muddiness, on the acoustic you get a nice body with a bit of shimmer on the high end, and on vocals you get amazing clarity with full low end which you can adjust by utilizing the proximity effect. 

freq.png
polar.png

Pros

  • Very detailed tone without sounding harsh

  • Prominent proximity effect that can be used to your advantage

  • Hyper Cardioid Polar Pattern assists in background noise rejection and feedback rejection

  • Minimal Handling Noise

  • Great Build Quality

Cons

  • Proximity effect can be a detriment if mic technique is poor

  • Not the best at rejecting plosives

  • Some may find it expensive in comparison to entry level live mics

Conclusion

I think this has become my new favorite handheld dynamic microphones. This thing cut right through mix on the vocals due to the presence and treble boost, and it also picked up minimal ambient noise, even when I was playing the acoustic guitar about 1 foot off-axis. The proximity effect also allows you to offset some of the detail, or beef up your voice if you have a thin voice. If you do not have good microphone technique, you will need to be careful on this thing because the proximity effect on this mic can be dangerous.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Beyerdynamic TG-V70D
US: https://amzn.to/2qkivlS
UK: https://amzn.to/2IFSllc
CA: https://amzn.to/2HmUe6X
DE: https://amzn.to/2II0CoR

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

Samson Q7 Dynamic Mic Review / Test

Today I'm talking about a dynamic XLR microphone by Samson; the Samson Q7 Dynamic Microphone.

This is an entry level dynamic microphone that has an insanely high Max SPL of 150dB. This leads me to believe that this would work great in a live situation.

For this video, I am connecting the mic to my computer using the Focusrite Scarlett Solo with my gain set at approximately 75%

If you are interested in this microphone kit, it will set you back $50 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone

  2. Mic Mount

  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Mic Stand Adapter

  4. Hardshell Carrying Case

  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 50Hz - 18kHz

  2. Polar Pattern: Super Cardioid

  3. Sensitivity: -57dB

  4. Max SPL: 150dB

  5. Impedance: 200-Ohms

Performance / Features

This mic has no frills or special features. No lights. No switches. Nothing. As far as the build quality, the construction is all metal and it feels incredibly sturdy and well put together. It also has some really nice weight to it. It feels like this mic would be able to handle the wear and tear of live use. 

The frequency response of this mic is pretty standard for a dynamic microphone, ranging from 50Hz - 18kHz. However, the sound signature is not my favorite of the dynamic mics I've tested. While listening to the acoustic it sounds like it lacks some high-mids while sounding a bit boomy in the low-mids. All in all, not my favorite EQ from a Samson microphone.

The polar pattern of the mic is Super Cardioid, which means it is extremely focussed. As you can tell during the tests, as soon as I move a little bit off axis the audio drops significantly. That is why I think this microphone would be an excellent decision for live performances as well as those who are concerned with excessive background noise.

Pros

  • Great build quality

  • Hardshell Carrying Case

  • Extremely directional (superb noise rejection)

  • Relatively cheap

Cons

  • Quiet output

  • Not the best EQ tuning

Conclusion

I think this microphone is nothing more than a middle of the road dynamic microphone. It's not a mic I anticipate using for anything in the future, but I won't go so far as to not recommend it. 

If you are looking for a relatively cheap microphone for live performances, I think that this would be a great option since it has excellent noise rejection as soon as you get off axis. This means it would work well if you are playing with a full band, as your vocal mic would ignore quite a bit of the guitar amp/drums/etc.

Another use case I think this microphone would be fine for would be let's plays. Once again, the mic does great with noise rejection so you will not pick up as much of your keyboards noise as you would with a regular cardioid condenser mic.

Other than that, I think that you can find a better option within the same price range. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Samson Q7
US: http://amzn.to/2hIam7G
UK: http://amzn.to/2i0AmsG

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett Solo
US: http://amzn.to/2iFxsKW
UK: http://amzn.to/2i0CrVE

Buy the XLR to USB Cable
US: http://amzn.to/2hIjivn
UK:http://amzn.to/2hIrQ5B

 

Rode Procaster Broadcast Dynamic Mic Review / Test

I've been waiting months to do this review, and I can't wait to put it up against it's USB counterpart in a future Versus Series. But for today, we're talking about the Rode Procaster. This is a Dynamic Broadcast XLR microphone, not to be confused with the Rode Podcaster, which is the USB version of this microphone.

This is a dynamic microphone, so it does not require phantom power. However, it does have a somewhat low output level, so you will end up turning your gain up relatively high. Therefore, I recommend picking up a Cloudlifter, if you plan on getting this mic.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $230 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Mic Mount
  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Mic Stand Adapter
  4. Carrying Case
  5. Documentation
  6. 10-Year Warranty
  7. A Damn Sticker!!!

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 75Hz - 18kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Sensitivity: -56dB
  4. Impedance: 320-Ohms

Performance / Features

This is how microphones should be built. This thing has an all metal construction, and has some REALLY nice weight to it. You can feel how substantial it is, and in all honesty, you could probably fight off an intruder and it would still work. The 10-year warranty, tells me how much faith Rode has in the quality of their mic. Even though the shockmount offers no shock absorption, the documentation does state that the capsule is protected by an internal shock mount as well as an internal pop filter. I did still run into some issues with plosives though, so i would still recommend an additional pop filter.

The frequency response of this mic is listed as 75Hz - 18kHz, which on paper, I was somewhat let down by, but once I heard it on my voice, I was back on board. The response is more than sufficient for voice overs / podcasts. The low end is full and tight, without being muddy, and the high end has nice presence and adds a great shimmer to your voice.

They list the polar pattern as Cardioid, and damn it, this thing is directional. As soon as I got slightly off axis, my voice dropped off a LOT. Also, when I smashed a keyboard behind the mic while speaking, you could hardly hear the keyboard. Some people might not like how narrow the polar pattern is, but for me, I love it. It will allow you to be in a room with multiple podcasters, and limit the amount of bleed between the microphones.

As far as other specs, they list a sensitivity of -56dB, and an impedance of 320-Ohms. Honestly, the sensitivity left a little bit to be desired. It is is a lot louder than the SM7b, but not quite as loud as the SM58. For the price, I would have liked to see slightly better output, but this is just me being overly critical.

Pros

  • Sounds Awesome on Voice
  • Amazing Build Quality
  • Excellent Noise Rejection
  • 10-Year Warranty

Cons

  • A little on the quiet side
  • Even with internal pop filter, still experience some issues with plosives
  • Does not sound good on guitar

Conclusion

I absolutely love this microphone, but keep in mind that the majority of what I do is vocal based. They tuned this thing specifically for vocals, and it produces superb vocal reproduction. On the other hand, if you're planning to record instruments with this microphone, I don't think that this microphone is going to cut it for you.

It is important to remember that this is a Broadcast Dynamic microphone, meaning it was designed to be used in a broadcast setting with multiple people talking in the same room and limiting the amount of bleed between microphones. That's the type of situation that this microphone will truly shine in.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them in the comments on this site or on the youtube channel, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Procaster:
US: http://amzn.to/2bPi8fR
UK: http://amzn.to/2c6RHSx

Buy the Cloudlifter:
US: http://amzn.to/2cA8Y6X
UK: NA

Pyle PDMICUSB6 USB Microphone Review / Test

Today we are looking at a budget USB Microphone by Pyle: The Pyle PDMICUSB6. This microphone is plug and play and is listed as compatible with windows and mac computer.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $25 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Microphone Mount (No Stand Adapter)
  3. 6.5-foot USB Cable
  4. Desktop Mic Stand
  5. Documentation

Performance / Features

The construction on this mic feels pretty nice. It has an all metal construction as well as some nice weight to it. The only feature on this microphone is an on/off switch to mute the microphone. However, during the review when I switched the mic to "off", a loud static became audible. The mic clip/mount is plastic and doesn't feel like it's good quality and the desktop mic stand feels of the same caliber while providing no shock absorption.

The frequency response is listed as 50Hz - 14kHz which is fine for a dynamic microphone similar to the Pyle PDMIC58. It did not sound particularly good on electric or acoustic guitar, but sounded fine on voice. 

The polar pattern is listed as cardioid and it does a very nice job of eliminating background noises like keyboards or outside noise. The sample rate is listed as 16-bit / 48kHz and the mic sensitivity is listed as 53dB.

It's fairly obvious that the built in interface is noisy. Once you get to approximately 30-40% input gain, a loud digital noise becomes apparent and essentially ruins the audio.

Pros

  • Decent construction
  • Affordable
  • Good at eliminating background noise.

Cons

  • DIGITAL NOISE IN BACKGROUND
  • Not best sound on guitars
  • When switched off generates hiss.

Conclusion

I can't recommend this microphone because of the incredibly loud digital interference once you hit 30% gain, as well as hiss generated when switching the mic off. The only use case I would recommend this microphone for is if you are on an incredibly tight budget, and only want a usb microphone. You can talk to people on Skype or in-game, but if you plan on recording any audio for a video or song, I would recommend you look elsewhere.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them in the comments on this site or on the youtube channel, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy it on Amazon
US: http://amzn.to/2bqRCqB
UK: http://amzn.to/2bcBnPc

BSP-022: Dynamic vs. Condenser Mics & How to Improve Your Audio

On episode 22, I talk about running into a crazy hippy in the desert, as well as how incredibly stressed and busy I have been the last few weeks. 

Then as the main topic, I discuss one of the most frequently asked questions, the difference between dynamic and condenser microphones, and then what are some of the best ways to improve your audio quality that most people don't do.

On this episode, I answered questions provided by ZacIsDolan, Super Sapp, Ahmet Kahraman, NerdCharacter, and Jay Snippety.

On episode 22, I talk about running into a crazy hippy in the desert, as well as how incredibly stressed and busy I have been the last few weeks.

Then as the main topic, I discuss one of the most frequently asked questions, the difference between dynamic and condenser microphones, and then what are some of the best ways to improve your audio quality that most people don't do.

On this episode, I answered questions provided by ZacIsDolan, Super Sapp, Ahmet Kahraman, NerdCharacter, and Jay Snippety.

Follow BSP on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bandrewsayspodcast
Follow BSP on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bandrewsays

http://www.geeksrising.com

00:00 - Intro
00:50 - Stressed Out
08:58 - Comedy Bang! Bang! Tv Show is BACK!
10:27 - Podcast Recommendations
QUESTIONS
11:11 - ZacisDolan-Road to 50 Subs: Why did my old mic pick up radio waves?
12:03 - Super Sapp: How mandatory in your opinion is it to get audio treatment? Does it effect the sound a lot?
14:52 - Ahmet Kahraman: How you buy lots of microphones
20:25 - NerdCharacter: What is the difference between dynamic mics and condenser?
25:25 - JaySnippety:  What are some of the simplest ways to improve audio that most people don’t do?
31:45 - Outro

Behringer Ultravoice XM8500 Review/Test

Today I'm testing out another cheap Dynamic Microphone. This time it is the Behringer Ultravoice XM8500.

Being that this is a Dynamic microphone, it does not require phantom power to function. That means that you should be able to utilize an XLR to USB cable (which I demonstrate in this video).

What's In the Box 

  1. Plastic Storage / Carrying Case
  2. Microphone
  3. Microphone Clip
  4. 5/8" to 3/8" Mic Stand Adapter
  5. Documentation

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone feels pretty sturdy. It is an all metal body and a metal grill and it has some nice weight to it. 

The mic has a Cardioid Polar Pattern, and it is incredibly directional. As you get off access, the amount of pickup drops exponentially. It rejects background noise incredibly well (you could hardly hear the keyboard), so if you are going to be using a mic in a loud area, this may be a good option.

The frequency response was not listed, but it sounds comparable to the frequency response of the SM58, with slightly boosted mid frequencies. Let's be honest. If you're buying a $20 microphone, chances are, you're not too concerned with the specifications, you're more worried about if it sounds good or not. Well, I think this microphone sounds good.

Pros

  • Extremely Cheap
  • Nice build quality
  • Decent sound
  • Good at Isolating sound

Cons

  • Lack of Documentation
  • Muddy low end

Conclusion

In all honesty, this is a nice sounding microphone for $20. There are it's draw backs, but you have to remember; It's $20! If you are on a budget and are looking for a durable microphone, this is a great option. It works with an XLR to USB cable, so all you need is the Mic, a Stand, and the Cable and you're good to go.

If you have any additional questions about this headset, leave them in the comments on this site or on the youtube channel, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Behringer XM8500: http://amzn.to/1S7zvWv
Pyle PDMIC58: http://amzn.to/1S7zwtD
USB to XLR Cable: http://amzn.to/1lMypB6 (not the cable used, but same type of cable)

Pyle PDMICR42 Review / Test

I have been so impressed with the last two Pyle mics that I tested out, that I had to test out this guy, the Pyle PDMICR42 Dynamic Microphone. This time Pyle is ripping off the Shure 55SH. This is another dynamic XLR microphone which means it will not require phantom power to work, however, I always want to note that I am connecting using a USB soundcard which is linked below. 

What's In the Box 

  1. Dynamic Microphone
  2. 5/8" to 3/8" Mic Stand Adapter
  3. XLR to 5.5mm (1/4") Cable
  4. Warranty

Performance / Features

The build quality on this thing feels terrible. It is an all plastic body, plastic mount, and plastic hinge; and this is not a sturdy feeling plastic. It feels incredibly weak. However, the microphone mount adapter is metal which is always nice, and the microphone cable seems to be good quality.

The frequency response on this thing is 30Hz - 15kHz which is a fairly standard frequency response. It performs fairly well in this area. The vocals sound nice and full and don't sound hollow or unnatural. The acoustic guitar sounded surprisingly nice with this microphone, and the electric guitar sounded pretty good too.

The microphone is also a cardioid polar pattern. The field of pick up is really nice for about 90-degrees, but continues to pick up the high end all the way to about 180-degrees. Once we get to that point, the high end drops off and we just hear low end response. This microphone also did really well at isolating my voice from the background noise from my keyboard. 

Pros

  • Nice Voice Sound
  • Decent performance with Instruments
  • Good at Isolating Sound

Cons

  • Cheap Build Quality
  • Digital hiss/noise when volume high
  • Really Bad at eliminating plosives
  • Poor Documentation

Conclusion

This is a decent sounding microphone, however I can't recommend it. It performs decently in the audio area, but not better than the PDMIC58 which is half the price. It is also really bad at eliminating plosives, and that means you would have to invest in a pop filter; since this is a non standard size, you would need a clip on pop filter which is not something you would want in a live situation (which is what these mics are made for).

I honestly, just can't think of anyone who would have any good reason to get this microphone over the Pyle PDMIC58 which sounds almost the same for a fraction of the cost. The cheaper microphone will also provide you the ability to use a standard ball pop filter, and use it in a live setting easily without worrying about breaking a cheap plastic microphone. If you have any additional questions about this headset, leave them in the comments on this site or on the youtube channel, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Pyle PDMICR42: http://amzn.to/1JGKPWw
Pyle PDMIC58: http://amzn.to/1JGKWRZ
Sabrent USB Adapter: http://amzn.to/1INAuru

Pyle PDMIC58 Dynamic Mic Review / Test

After testing out the PDMIC78, I couldn't wait to test out this microphone, the PYLE PDMIC58. This mic is nothing more than Pyle's response to the Shure SM58; a Dynamic XLR microphone that feels sturdy. The main difference between this and the Shure SM58 is the price. This microphone is $13, and the Shure is $100+. So, keep that in mind throughout this review.

It's also important to know that this is a dynamic microphone, so it shouldn't require any voltage to function, however I am plugging it into my Sabrent USB Adapter. 

What's In the Box 

  1. Dynamic Microphone
  2. 15-foot XLR to 1/4" Microphone Cable
  3. Warranty / Spec Sheet

Performance / Features

The build quality on this microphone feels pretty good and it feels very similar to the Shure SM58. It is an all metal body and a metal grill just like the SM58, however, it is about half the weight. This means that either their are fewer components inside, the body is not all metal, or the metal is a lighter metal. I can't fault Pyle for the minor differences in build quality due to the mic being ~$90 cheaper. 

The frequency response is 50Hz - 15kHz which is actually the same as the Shure. They did not include a diagram showing the actual frequency response of the microphone but when comparing the audio it seems like there are a lot more highs on the Pyle. All around it performed well in this regards. (in the video, the electric guitar example provides the most notable difference between the microphones EQ)

The impedance of this microphone is 600-Ohms compared to the 300-Ohms of the Shure. Basically what this means is that the Pyle will not perform as well if it is running through a long cable; it will lose some of the high frequencies. This isn't the biggest deal if you are just using the microphone in a home studio, but once you start throwing long cables on this microphone, you may start to notice a bigger impact.

The microphone is also uni-directional. That means that it only picks up audio directly in front of the microphone. As soon as you get off axis, the sound decreases quite a bit. That's why this kind of microphone is used in concert settings. It isolates the sound source really well, while eliminating surrounding noise.

Pros

  • SUPER CHEAP!!!
  • Good Sound Quality
  • Good Build Quality
  • Good at Isolating Sound

Cons

  • Bad with Plosives (need to Invest in pop filter)
  • Poor Documentation

Conclusion

All around this mic sounds great for the price. It's $13 and it performed pretty closely to the $100 microphone in a controlled setting. The real test would be to take this thing out back and beat the hell out of it because that's what's amazing about the Shure SM58; it's indestructible. I'm thinking that this microphone won't survive as much as the SM58, but it's a great starter for the price.

I think that the folks that would really benefit from this mic would be beginning podcasters. This microphone (with a ball pop filter on top) will sound great for a solo podcast, but you can also have multiple people in the same room, each with their own microphone, and you will have minimal bleed between the microphone.

For gamers, I'm not sure if this is the best microphone since you will need to stay right on top of the microphone to get the best audio, but it will be great at cancelling out the background noise. You will need to decide if you're willing to buy a boom arm and keep the mic close to your mouth the entire time your gaming. If you're willing to do that, this is a great mic.

For music, I think this did really well with the electric guitar and voice, but for an acoustic instrument, I think you'd be better off with a condenser microphone to pick up more of the ambience of the instrument. 

Overall, I'm really impressed with this microphone and I recommend this to most people. If you have any additional questions about this headset, leave them in the comments on this site or on the youtube channel, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Pyle PDMIC58: http://amzn.to/1mx01eM
Ball Pop Filter: http://amzn.to/1JUlWkL

Yuker Mic-001 Condenser Microphone Review / Test

Today I am reviewing the Yuker Mic-001. This mic is pretty cheap (approximately $27 US Dollars) and it comes with almost everything you will need to get started recording, sans microphone stand and audio interface.

This microphone bears an uncanny resemblance to the BM-700 and NW-700, so much so that I'm going to guess that it's manufactured by the same company. In the video I do a brief comparison and there are some minor audio differences. I also pulled apart these microphones below and took some pictures of the inner workings, and it is safe to say that they are not exact copies of one another.

What's In the Box

In this box you get everything you need to start recording other than a microphone stand and a USB audio adapter. You are going to get the actual microphone, a ball pop filter, a shock mount, and a cable (XLR to 3.5mm). The last thing you get in the box is a specifications sheet.

The box was missing 5/8" to 3/8" microphone stand adapter. However, if you buy a neewer microphone boom arm to use with this microphone, you will get an adapter with the stand.

Performance / Features

I have a problem. The spec sheet that I received had an image of a random microphone on it. The specifications on the specs sheet, and specifications on the amazon page were different as well. On top of this, the amazon page listed features that were not present on this microphone.

The frequency response of this microphone is either 20Hz - 20KHz, or 20Hz - 16KHz, I'm going to assume it is 20Hz to 20KHz because that is what the BM-700's frequency response is. The polar pattern is uni-directional (approximately 180-degrees at 1KHz) as well.

Comparison of inner working of Yuker Mic 001 & the BM-700

The amazon page states that this microphone has two switches: (1) Bass-Reduction switch to reduce room noise, and (2) -10dB overload protection switch to protect against clipping. I did not see either of these options on the microphone, I even unscrewed the whole thing, to make sure they were not internal options. 

There is the possibility that they mean "electronic switches", as in electronic components on the computer chips within the microphone, but I cannot be certain. I have included an image of the MIC-001 and the BM-700's inner electronics for reference. However, when I look at the spec sheet provided, it shows a the option to roll off the frequency response at around 100hz. This leads me to believe that there should be two physical switches on this microphone. one to activate the bass reduction and one to activate -10db pad. 

The build quality of this microphone is decent, but it is definitely a stay at home microphone. This is not the microphone you want if you are going to be traveling and want to record on the road. The shock mount does it's job perfectly, and the cable seems to be a high quality cable that will last for a while.

Pros

  • Cheap

  • Decent Sound Quality

  • Comes with Almost Everything you Need

  • XLR Microphone (can use different preamps, interfaces, etc.)

Cons

  • Unclear specifications

  • Features listed on Amazon, are not on the microphone

Conclusion

I think that this is a decent option for a microphone if you are on a budget. You can get everything you need to start for about $40-50. Because the audio quality of the Mic-001, the BM-700, BM-800, and NW-700 are all very similar, I would recommend shopping around and checking to see which is the cheapest.

I should note that I hook this microphone up using a $6 USB Audio adapter (linked below) which provides 5 volts of power, improving the audio quality. If you have any questions about the microphone, leave them in the comments down below or on youtube and I will get back to you ASAP. Thanks for watching & reading. 

Yuker Mic-001: http://amzn.to/1Qxn4C1
USB Audio Adapter: http://amzn.to/1X1asBV