BSP-119: Google Kills YouTube Red...Sort of, Lil Tay Get's Mother Fired, and more

On episode 119 of the BSP, I talk about Google Killing / Rebranding YouTube Red to YouTube Premium, YouTube adding music credits in descriptions, Lil Tay getting her mother fired, YouTube adding Tastemade & The Young Turks to YouTubeTV, Facebook launching Youth guidelines, Facebook launching Voice posts and photo/video storage, more Facebook data exposed, and Call of Duty IIII release.

Discord Server (https://discord.gg/dXQUc7v)

00:00 - Intro
00:40 - Clarification on Smart Phone Addiction
01:37 - Good Use Case for Google Duplex
02:50 - Google Kills YouTube Red, Sort of…
04:50 - YouTube Gives Musicians Proper Credit
07:08 - Lil Tay Gets Mom Fired
12:01 - YouTubeTV Brings in Tastemade & The Young Turks
14:26 - Facebook Loves the Youths
* https://www.facebook.com/safety/youth/peer-voices/principles
18:05 - Facebook Launching Voice Posts & Photo/Video Storage
20:43 - More Facebook Data Exposed via Personality Quizzes
* https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/14/17352900/facebook-data-exposed-personality-quiz
22:48 - Call of Duty IIII or IV Coming Soon
24:00 - What You Had to Say - Two Party Consent
26:00 - Ask Bandrew
26:25 - Email 1
26:58 - Opinions on Fortnite?
28:16 - Thoughts on the Royal Wedding?
28:47 - How do you get back into Podcasting?
29:55 - Outro

Submit your questions to be answered on a future episode to AskBandrew@gmail.com

The Bandrew Says Podcast is available on:
►iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bandrew-says-podcast-audio/id1046423132?mt=2
►Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/music/m/Ieua25h7tadlb2ti4p5nclqhjuu?t=The_Bandrew_Says_Podcast_Audio_Video__Tech
►RSS Feed: http://bandrewsays.libsyn.com

Follow us on:
► Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bandrewsayspodcast
► Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bandrewsays
► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

Steinberg UR-RT2 USB Audio Interface Review

If you're like me, and you've always drooled over Rupert Neve gear, but wasn't ever able to afford it, the Steinberg UR-RT2, may be the cheapest way for you to get your hands on some of that subtle Neve tone. 

During this review, I have the Rode NT1 connected directly to the Arrow, recording at 24-bit, 192kHz, with my gain set at 12:00. I have done no post processing to the audio, but it was boosted ~4dB in Final Cut Pro to make it easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this interface, it will set you back $350.00 on Amazon, and many other retailers.

What's In the Box

  1. Interface
  2. USB Cable
  3. DC Power Adapter
  4. Quick Start Guide
  5. Cubase AI / Cubase LE, and more

Specifications

  1. Bit Depth: 24-Bit
  2. Sample Rate: 44.1 - 192kHz
  3. Gain Range: 6 - 60dB
  4. Dynamic Range: 101dBA
  5. Input Impedance: 4K Ohms
  6. Phantom Power: +48v

Performance / Features

The build quality of this interface feels great, like other Steinberg interfaces I've tested. The dials all feel firmly attached, with minmal wobble. The XLR ports and other inputs are the same, they do have a minor amount of wiggle, but nothing out of the ordinary.

The overall performance of this interface is pretty good. If I'm not mistaken, this has the same D-Pre's as Steinbergs lower end models, but they still offer +60dB of gain. When I measured the noise floor, I was measuring around -100dB at 100%. The A/D converters are also perfectly fine, allowing you to record 24-bit, 192kHz. When at 192kHz, I was able to get down to 2.7ms output latency with an I/O buffer size of 64 samples.

The selling point of this interface though, are the 2 Neve Transformers, that you can route Channel 1 or Channel 2 through. I found the most noticeable area of improvement here was when plugging instruments in direct. Typically, those instruments sound somewhat sterile, and lifeless. By initializing the Neve transformers, it added a bit of natural compression and saturation which, to my ear, accentuated the overtones of my instrument and added some life and excitement back into the recording. 

Pros

  • Rupert Neve Transformers
  • 24-Bit 192kHz High Res A/D convertors
  • 3ms output latency at 192kHz
  • +60dB of gain
  • 2 additional line inputs on the rear
  • Great build quality
  • Offers full +48v phantom power

Cons

  • Expensive for 2 mic preamp interface
  • The DSPFX software seems outdated, and clucky
  • Not a big fan of the DC power requirement
  • Would have preferred USB3.0 or Thunderbolt 3.0

Conclusion

I think this is a fascinating interface. It sounds great, and it is the cheapest way to get some subtle Rupert Neve tone in your home studio mixes. Other than the Neve transformers, I think it's a perfectly fine interface, with a few minor drawbacks. With that being said, if you're a musician, and you find your mixes sounding sterile, this may be a good interface to help breathe a little bit of life back into your recordings. On the other hand, if you're a voice over artist, I don't think this offers much for you, so I'd save a few dollars, and consider picking up something like the Audient ID4 instead. 

If you have any additional questions about this interface, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Steinberg UR-RT2
US: https://amzn.to/2wM9fNU
UK: N/A
CA: N/A
DE: N/A

Buy the Rode NT1 Kit
US: http://amzn.to/2i1eWfO
UK: http://amzn.to/2i3uFh8
CA: http://amzn.to/2qzk3dz
DE: http://amzn.to/2FCzPsk

TRP-133: Ten Times A Tiger!

Cynthia Gerriets the amazing toy designer (Ten Times A Tiger) and my fiance returns to the podcast to talk about her latest art toys and catch up on the things that have happened in our lives recently.

Cynthia lets us know a little bit about the process of toy making and the kind of music she enjoys while creating. Spoilers its hip hop among many other styles and mix a little bit of wine in there and you got a combination for some amazing Designer Toys!

Send Your Questions to:

thepaperrobots@gmail.com

Follow:

CYNTHIA GERRIETS

LOGAN NAUGLE

REFERENCED

BSP-118: Google Assistant Makes Calls, Phil Defranco Launches Video App, and More

On episode 118 of the BSP, I talk about Gmail composing your e-mails for you, Google’s camera allowing you to copy text from a photo, Google Assistant (Duplex) making phone calls for you, HDR playback on YouTube going live on iOS, YouTube rolling out a “Take a Break” feature, Philip DeFranco launching a stand alone video app, Hulu launching a channel guide, Apple removing apps that share location data, Apple selling streaming subscriptions, Apple launching a credit card, Apple disabling USB connections if your iOS device is locked for 7 days, Twitter rolling out encrypted direct messages, Rick & Morty renewed for 70 episodes, and Syfy not renewing the Expanse.

Discord Server (https://discord.gg/dXQUc7v)

00:00 - Intro
00:53 - Gmail Can Compose Your E-mails For You
02:23 - Google Lens Can Copy Text from Photos
03:45 - Google Assistant Making Phone Calls
08:37 - HDR YouTube Playback on iOS Available
08:58 - YouTube “Take a Break” Feature
11:47 - Philip DeFranco Launches Stand Alone Video App
14:46 - Hulu Launches a Channel Guide
15:50 - Apple Removing Apps That Share Location Data
17:34 - Apple Selling Streaming Subscriptions
18:32 - Apple Launching a Credit Card
20:07 - Apple Disabling USB Connections if Device is Locked for 7 Days
22:27 - Twitter May Be Working on Encrypted Direct Messages
23:55 - Rick And Morty Renewed for 70 More Episodes
25:09 - SyFy Does Not Renew The Expanse
25:57 - What You Had to Say!
28:00 - Ask Bandrew
28:18 - Email 1
28:55 - Thoughts on Google Digital Well Being Initiative?
30:23 - Email 2
30:42 - Rank RE20, SM7B, Procaster on 1-10 Scale
31:49 - Email 3
32:04 - What are your computer specs?
33:20 - Outro

Submit your questions to be answered on a future episode to AskBandrew@gmail.com

The Bandrew Says Podcast is available on:
►iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bandrew-says-podcast-audio/id1046423132?mt=2
►Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/music/m/Ieua25h7tadlb2ti4p5nclqhjuu?t=The_Bandrew_Says_Podcast_Audio_Video__Tech
►RSS Feed: http://bandrewsays.libsyn.com

Follow us on:
► Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bandrewsayspodcast
► Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bandrewsays
► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

TPR 132: Performer/Artist Cristina Florez

It was a blast talking to Cristina about choreography, music and art in general. Artist and Performer Cristina Florez calls in and we talk about the field of creativity and how it cant fit in just one box but all mediums intersect and blend together. We both have learned so much by studying and working in different types of mediums to be creative. 

Follow:

CRISTINA FLOREZ

LOGAN NAUGLE

REFERENCED

 

Follow us on:

► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepaperrobots

► Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paper_Robots

► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

 

Razer Seiren Elite Dynamic USB Mic Review

Today we're looking at the brand new Dynamic USB Streaming Microphone from Razer, the Seiren Elite.

For the majority of this review, I was connected to my Mac, which did not have gain controls on my computer, but the gain on the microphone was set to 100%. On the windows machine, I set the computer gain to 77%, and the microphones gain to around 25%. The audio was then boosted in post, which is notated in the lower third on the video.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $200.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Desktop Stand
  3. Windscreen
  4. 3m Braided Cable
  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Max SPL: 120dB
  4. Features: Analog/Digital Limiter
  5. Bit-Depth: 16-Bit
  6. Sample Rate: 48kHz

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone is good for the most part. It has a metal body coated in a rubbery paint, it has a metal grill, and the desktop stand is metal with a good amount of weight and a foam bottom to keep it from sliding around your desk. On the downside, the dials are a bit wobbly, and they have no markings to assist in determining your gain setting or headphone volume. 

The frequency response is listed as 20Hz - 20kHz. They do not provide a graph, but honestly, I don't think the graph would even help. The limiter is set so extreme that it sounds as though the audio is being overly compressed, which would affect the frequency response anyways. 

The polar pattern of this mic is standard cardioid, and did a surprisingly good job at side and rear rejection which is exactly what you want out of a microphone that will be used in a noisy environment like a gaming room. 

The overall performance of this device was a huge let down. First off, the noise floor on this thing was excessive, making all the audio sound dirty. The limiter also sounded as though the threshold was set too low, meaning it was activated too frequently, causing the recording to sound overly compressed. This mic also did not do a good job at rejecting shocks, so if you bump your desk at all, this mic picks it up, which is the last thing you'd want in a gaming microphone. Additionally, my unit had so much hiss in the headphone amp that it was almost deafening (I will be replacing this mic to determine if the headphone amp in another device is better). 

Pros

  • Plug and play
  • Good job at background noise rejection
  • Has zero latency monitoring
  • Offers a limiter

Cons

  • Expensive for what you're getting
  • Unable to turn off or adjust the limiter
  • Can't turn off or adjust the mix of the 0 latency monitoring
  • The noise floor on this thing is too loud
  • Little to no shock absorption
  • The headphone amp (in my unit) was insanely noisy

Conclusion

I do not recommend this microphone at all. On paper, it's a nearly perfect streaming microphone, but in practice or execution it did not meet any expectations. So although I do not think you should buy this, I will be keeping my eye on Razer for the next iteration of this microphone to see if they improve this.

If Razer is reading this, I will give some suggestions. Please add software functions to this device to allow people to adjust the limiter's settings or turn it off. Please allow users to shut off zero latency monitoring, or at least mix between computer playback and 0 latency monitoring. Please add some kind of internal shockmount for the capsule to assist in shock absorption. Please put in a better preamp so the noise floor is not so loud in this device. However, I think you're on the right track here. I can't wait for the next iteration.  

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Razer Seiren Elite (but are you sure?)
US: https://amzn.to/2K33ld7
UK: https://amzn.to/2jEGXLV
CA: https://amzn.to/2wlTYmP
DE: https://amzn.to/2rxGKOn

BSP-117: Gibson Declares Bankruptcy, Twitter Passwords in Plain Text, Facebook Dating, & More

On episode 117 of the BSP, I talk about Gibson declaring bankruptcy, YouTube ad targeting based on playback device, YouTube pulling 1,400 videos due to ad reads, YouTube having 1.8 Billion active members per month, Viacom launching a digital studio, Twitter announcing 30 new video content deals, Twitter storing your passwords in plain text, Facebook launching a dating service, and a more sustainable MoviePass competitor.

Discord Server (https://discord.gg/dXQUc7v)

00:00 - Intro
00:46 - Gibson Declares Bankruptcy
02:28 - YouTube Targets You Based on Playback Device
05:25 - YouTube Pulls 1400 Videos that Advertise Website that Advocates Cheating
08:36 - YouTube Has 1.8 Billion Logged in Users per Month
10:21 - Viacom Launches Digital Studio
13:15 - Twitter Announces 30 New Content Deals
* (https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/twitter-announces-over-30-premium-video-content-deals-at-digital-content-newfronts-expands-depth-and-breadth-of-programming-slate-300639486.html)
15:30 - Twitter Stored Passwords in Plain Text
21:00 - Facebook Launches a Dating Service
22:62 - MoviePass Competitor Appears
27:01 - Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Keyboard
28:51 - What you had to say
33:20 - Ask Bandrew
33:35 - Email 1
34:21 - Can you use this mic?
34:37 - Why’d you use the RE20?
34:48 - What’s your favorite things to do?
35:21 - What’s your favorite food?
35:30 - Why is your main channel Podcastage?
35:58 - Do you think there will be peace between North Korea & America
36:39 - Email 2
37:07 - What’s a song that reminds you of summer?
37:50 - What song makes you want to dance?
38:26 - What’s a song that reminds you of you?
39:15 - Outro

Submit your questions to be answered on a future episode to AskBandrew@gmail.com

The Bandrew Says Podcast is available on:
►iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bandrew-says-podcast-audio/id1046423132?mt=2
►Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/music/m/Ieua25h7tadlb2ti4p5nclqhjuu?t=The_Bandrew_Says_Podcast_Audio_Video__Tech
►RSS Feed: http://bandrewsays.libsyn.com

Follow us on:
► Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bandrewsayspodcast
► Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bandrewsays
► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

How To Set Your Gain for Beginners

Gain can be a very complicated topic, so in this article, I will try to make it as simple as possible.

1. What is gain?

Simply put, gain is how much you are amplifying (or increasing the level) or your microphones output signal. This is necessary because microphone's output signals are very quiet, and you need to get this signal to a level that you are able to work with in post production. 

2. Factors that impact gain requirements.

I receive the question "What's the best gain to use on this microphone/preamp", and to tell you the truth there is no absolute answer there. This is because there are multiple factors that impact how you set your gain.

  1. Loudness of the sound source: If you're recording someone whispering, the sound source will be quiet and you will need more gain. On the other hand, if you're recording a guitar amplifier with the volume set to 11, you will need significantly less gain.
     
  2. Distance between the sound source & the microphone: The farther away the sound source is from the microphone, the quieter the audio that is being picked up. Therefore, if you are 6 inches away from a microphone, you'll need less gain than you would if you were 10 feet away.
     
  3. Sensitivity of the microphone: Sensitivity of a microphone tells you how loud the output signal of this mic is. Dynamic & Ribbon mics typically have a quieter signal when compared to condenser microphones. So if you're using a dynamic, you'll need a higher gain than you would if you were using a condenser.

3. What level should you record at?

I've heard many people say "Record so you're hitting -18dB on your meter", others have said "Record at -10dB" and others say "Record at -6dB". Regardless of what level you choose, when this is being said, it means you are recording so your peaks (the loudest parts of your recording) hit -6dB, -10dB, or -18dB. 

Screen Shot 2018-05-02 at 9.11.19 PM.png

The reasoning behind this is to allow for headroom. Headroom is nothing more than the difference between the loudest part of your recording and 0dB, which is where your recording will begin to clip. 

For example: if I am recording spoken word, and I set my preamp gain so I'm hitting -10dB at my loudest, then my voice can unexpectedly get 10dB louder before I begin clipping/distorting, ultimately ruining the recording. 

It ultimately comes down to how dynamic the sound source you're recording is. If it is a sine wave that does not change volume, you can probably set your preamp to record around -1dB or -2dB. But if you're recording an expressive singer that goes from soft singing to screaming in a single take, this can vary drastically in loudness, so you may want to set your preamp so you're hitting -10dB or even -18dB.

4. How does gain affect your sound?

There are many schools of thoughts, and arguments to be had regarding coloration of preamp on your recordings, but we're going to avoid those in this article and focus on the more noticeable impact on your recording.

  1. Setting your gain too high: When you set your gain too high (i.e. so you're hitting -1dB on your meter), this does not allow for any wiggle room. You have to remain consistent in your levels, and if you get excited and begin to speak loudly, your signal will exceed 0dB and clip or distort.

    Once you have recorded something and it contains clipping, there is nothing that can be done to clean up that recording. You're stuck with it. So I would always suggest you err on the side of caution and record slightly quieter than you think you need.
     
  2. Setting your gain too low: This issue seems to be less pervasive online, but if you set your gain too low and you're using a subpar preamp with a high noise floor you risk losing, or mixing your signal in the noise floor.

    What this means is that if your preamp has a noise floor of -50dB, and you're recording so you're peaks are hitting -30dB, you're going to run into some issues. This is caused because in post, you're going to have to boost this recording by ~30dB. This means that your noise floor is no longer -50dB, but it's been boosted so it will be -20dB. So just remember, when you're boosting your recording in post, you're not just boosting the recorded sound source, you're also boosting the noise that's introduced by your preamp.

Conclusion

I think that should give you a basic framework to work off when you're setting up your preamp/interface before recording a podcast or youtube video. Until next time, may your recordings have no clipping, a low noise floor, and contain good content. Good luck.

 

 

 

TPR-131: WRITER CHRIS A. BOLTON

Writer Chris A. Bolton returns to the podcast to chat about his new comic Smash Vol. 2 as well as provide his origin story into comics writing.

While discussing  our passion a starts as writers in comics Chris and I develop the most compelling Pac Man story the world has ever known!

Send Your Questions to:

thepaperrobots@gmail.com

Follow:

LOGAN NAUGLE

  • Twitter:  @thatlogan
  • Instagram: @thatlogan
  • Comics: thatlogan.com/comics

CHRIS BOLTON

REFERENCED

Follow us on:

► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepaperrobots

► Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paper_Robots

► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

Cyber Acoustics CVL-2001 USB Mic Review

The clearing of all the cheap microphones off of my shelves continues, and today I'm reviewing the Cyber Acoustics CVL-2001.

During the majority of this review the mic is connected directly to my mac with the gain set at 65%. I did boost the audio slightly during portions of the test to make it listenable. During other portions of the test, I connected the mic to a Joby Gorillapod to get the mic closer to my mouth.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $40.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Pre installed desktop mount/stand
  3. USB Cable
  4. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 40Hz - 18kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Bit-Depth: 16-Bit
  4. Sample Rate: 44.1kHz

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels pretty terrible. It has a cheap plastic body that feels very flimsy. It has a metal grill that I dented by barely squeezing it, demonstrating how bad the metal is. On the bottom of the mic, you will find a 1/4" threading (standard camera threading) as opposed to 3/8" or 5/8" which is standard for microphones. On the rear of the mic you have the USB port, and on the top of the mic you have an LED indicator light to let you know if you're getting power. 

The frequency response is listed as 40Hz - 18kHz, and it sounds about as good as you would expect out of a $40 usb microphone. I did not do any close micing of instruments due to the poorly designed mounting options, so I cannot speak to that. I can however speak to the awful proximity effect of this thing. If you're speaking between 1-3 inches of this mic, it becomes terribly muddy and unintelligible. 

The polar pattern of this mic is standard cardioid. The off axis coloration is very drastic, and it did not do a good job at off-axis or rear rejection. This is very important considering it is mounted on a desk mount that offers no shock absorption from the desk.

The overall performance of this mic was awful. The reason I say that is because of the noise floor which was terribly loud, causing a constant hiss in the background. Additionally, there is a grounding/shielding issue that adds a hum into the mix. So not only do you have a hiss, but you have a electronic hum to also destroy your recording. These two factors really ruin the microphone, and should make you look to other options. 

Pros

  • Plug and play
  • Surprisingly good latency

Cons

  • Noise floor unacceptably loud
  • Grounding/Shielding issue causing electronic hum
  • Poorly design 1/4" threading
  • Cheap build quality

Conclusion

DO NOT BUY THIS MICROPHONE! 15 years ago you may have to suffer through the high noise floor and hum, but with how competitive the USB mic market is, you do not need to settle for that. If you're on a super tight budget you can go with the Neewer NW3u, which cost me about $15 and I think goes for $20 now, which offers equal tone, and much better noise floor performance with no electronic hum. The Marantz PodPack1 is another great option which sounds better, has no noise floor/hum, and comes with a boom arm, all for $10 more. So bottom line is, I see almost no reason why someone should buy this microphone. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Cyber Acoustics CVL-2001
US: https://amzn.to/2HE3iaL
UK: N/A
CA: https://amzn.to/2HCTg9S
DE: N/A

BSP-116: Video Streaming Growth, YouTube's Copyright System, Amazon Accessing Your Car, & More

On episode 116 of the BSP, we cover Video streaming growth and what it means for creators, Discord coming to Xbox, Human curated YouTube kids app, Youtube’s new copyright system, Amazon prime price increase, Amazon accessing your vehicle trunk, and Amazon launching a Kid focussed echo. In listener feedback we hear a parents view on YouTube kids, a correction on Facebook paid accounts, Youtube forcing diversification of revenue streams, and a couple’s opinion on Netflix movie theaters.

Discord Server (https://discord.gg/dXQUc7v)

00:00 - Intro
00:40 - What You Had to Say
00:48 - A parents view on YouTube Kids
02:19 - The truth about paid facebook accounts
02:48 - Youtube forcing diversification of revenue streams
06:22 - A couple’s thoughts on Netflix Theaters
06:54 - Video Streaming Growth
09:16 - Discord Coming to Xbox
10:25 - Human curated YT Kids App going live
12:12 - YouTube’s New Copyright System
* (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ovs06SJ5jmQ)
15:04 - Amazon Prime price increase to $120/year
16:45 - Amazon wants access to your trunk
20:01 - Amazon launches a Kid Friendly Echo Dot
21:38 - What I’ve been Testing
22:51 - Ask Bandrew
23:18 - Email 1
* (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IToG4CxawLg&list=PL0liJGrq7wsxc_FeJhAKzcgPJNT3r8ZEy&index=11)
24:17 - Favorite Youtube video this week?
* (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrcJz63En94&list=PLANorT3Y7McMKzxqTw8u8ykq3pe_6A0Tn)
23:45 - PSA of the week? 
27:32 - Email 2
28:05 - What content creator would you like to meet or spend a day with?
30:45 - Email 3 / My Nightmare
32:29 - Outro 

Submit your questions to be answered on a future episode to AskBandrew@gmail.com

The Bandrew Says Podcast is available on:
►iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bandrew-says-podcast-audio/id1046423132?mt=2
►Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/music/m/Ieua25h7tadlb2ti4p5nclqhjuu?t=The_Bandrew_Says_Podcast_Audio_Video__Tech
►RSS Feed: http://bandrewsays.libsyn.com

Follow us on:
► Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bandrewsayspodcast
► Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bandrewsays
► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

Neewer NW-8 XLR Condenser Mic Review

Today I review another super cheap OEM microphone from China from Neewer, the Neewer NW-8.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 10:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $30.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Windscreen
  3. Shockmount
  4. 5/8" to 3/8" Adapter
  5. XLR to 3.5mm Cable
  6. 3.5mm TRRS Splitter
  7. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Sensitivity: ~-37dB
  4. Impedance: 150-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels sub par. The body is all plastic with a metal grill. It does have a little bit of weight to it which adds a decent feel to it, but all around it feels like an unreliable, poorly built microphone. 

The frequency response is listed as 20Hz - 20kHz. They did not provide a frequency response graph of this microphone, which is not surprising given the price. Listening to it though, it sounds as though it lacks in the low end as well as the high end, making for a somewhat mid forward microphone.

The polar pattern of this mic is standard cardioid. It does not do a great job at off axis or background noise rejection, and the coloring as you move around the mic changes pretty drastically. 

The overall performance of this mic is about as good as you would expect out of a $30 microphone. If you connect it direct to your computer with the provided 3.5mm cables, it does not sound good at all as there is lots of noise. If you connect it to an USB Audio Interface with phantom power and an XLR cable, it sounds decent. As previously mentioned it does seem very mid forward, but I did not hate it for electric, acoustic, or for singing. For spoken word, the lack in the low end, and the lack in clarity makes this sound like exactly what it is, a $30 microphone. 

Pros

  • Dirt cheap
  • Lots of accessories
  • When connected to USB Audio Interface, it's usable

Cons

  • Not a good build quality
  • When connected as 3.5mm mic, it sounds bad
  • Lacks in low end & high end. 

Conclusion

If you are just recording demos so you can hear your song ideas, I think this microphone would be fine. But if you're planning on using this microphone for any form of professional application I believe you should move on to another microphone. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Neewer NW-8
US: https://amzn.to/2Khy7jl
UK: https://amzn.to/2HsUMLD
CA: https://amzn.to/2r0CAz4
DE: https://amzn.to/2r5j03w

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

TPR-130: SUNSHINE AND POWERCUTS

This episodes guest is host of, Sunshine & Power Cuts, Heather Welch. She a positive and warm person spreading positive living by connecting with nature and off the grid living. Her post covers topics of positivity and how to connect with nature while living in the modern age as well as provides insight into off the grid living.

We get into the nature of how the podcast came to be as well as where see wants everything to go!

Congrats to Heather on 6 years off he grid.

Huge thanks for giving my show a listen and also for having such a lovely show. It has helped remind me to be calm and remember my connection to nature but to others.

Send Your Questions to:

thepaperrobots@gmail.com

Follow:

HEATHER WELCH / SUNSHINE AND POWER CUTS

LOGAN NAUGLE

Sennheiser E935 Handheld Dynamic Mic Review

Today we're looking at a handheld dynamic microphone from Sennheiser, the E935.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen, with the gain set at 3:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $180.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Microphone Mount
  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Adapter
  4. Carrying Pouch
  5. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 40Hz - 18kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Sensitivity: ~-51dB
  4. Impedance: 350-ohms

Performance / Features

The build quality of this mic feels like it was made for the stage. It has a very substantial feel in the hand, with an all metal body, a very sturdy metal mesh grill, and a good amount of weight to it. There are no bells or whistles on this microphone either. It is a just a microphone with an XLR port so you don't screw anything up while you're performing on stage. 

The frequency response is listed as 40Hz - 18kHz. The frequency response on this mic begins to gradually roll off the bass at around 150Hz with a minor .5dB cut beginning at around 500Hz. From 500 Hz up to 1kHz, we see a gradual boost . and then we remain flat up to 2.5kHz at which point we begin another boost of ~ 3.5dB which remains relatively flat from 4kHz - 10kHz. There is a minor peak at 11kHz, and then a roll off that decreases steadily. 

The polar pattern of this mic is standard cardioid. The off axis and rear coloration are not terribly drastic which is a benefit. The main thing I noticed about this mic is how great it did at off-axis rejection. When playing an acoustic guitar a few inches away while singing, you could definitely hear the acoustic, but it was not distracting from the voice at all. 

The overall performance of this mic is excellent for stage use. On the electric guitar, you get some very bright and aggressive tones, as well as a nice bass roll off which cleans up the mix, and makes room for the bass to do it's job. On the acoustic you get a nice full body with plenty of high end attack which sounded very nice. Then on voice for singing the presence and treble boost allow this mic to cut through the mix, and the bass roll off helps tame any proximity effect, handling noise, or plosives. Unfortunately, the presence boost does introduce some minor sibilance issues.

freq.png
polar.png

Pros

  • Excellent performance in regards to handling noise & plosive rejection
  • Great off-axis rejection for a cardioid microphone
  • More extended high end for added clarity
  • Sturdy build quality for stage use

Cons

  • Presence and treble boost lead to S's sounding slightly sharp

Conclusion

For stage use I think this microphone performed excellent, especially for a cardioid microphone. This mics ability to reject plosives (better than most dynamics), avoid handling noise, and tame proximity effect makes this a great mic for venues who cater to artists who do not necessarily have the best microphone technique. If you're a podcaster or let's player who is also concerned with background noise and not afraid of a mic being in your face, I think this thing will do a fine job for you. No matter what use case you are buying this mic though, if you are using this on voice, make sure to pay attention to the sibilance as it is somewhat sensitive in that frequency range and you may need to eq some of that out of your recording. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Sennheiser E935
US: https://amzn.to/2HmBLGU
UK: https://amzn.to/2FbKTvX
CA: https://amzn.to/2Jkld2Q
DE: https://amzn.to/2qOAF0j

Buy the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (2nd Gen)
US: http://amzn.to/2vDFbzK 
UK: http://amzn.to/2w8O2f6 
CA: http://amzn.to/2wKGKfG 
DE: http://amzn.to/2hbtxsV

BSP-115: YouTube Updates on 2018 Creator Priorities

(https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/)
(1-800-273-8255)

On episode 115 of the BSP, I talk about Apple launching a paid news service, Susan Wojicki’s updates to YouTube’s 2018 Creator Priorities, YouTube potentially violating child privacy laws (COPPA), Highlights from Mark Zuckerbergs hearings with Congress and the House, Russia banning Telegram, National Geographic launching a mini-series on Ebola, and Netflix buying Movie Theaters.

Discord Server (https://discord.gg/dXQUc7v)

00:00 - Intro
00:52 - Apple Paid News Subscription Service
01:49 - YouTube’s Updates to 2018 Creator Priorities
07:23 - YouTube Potentially Violating Child Privacy Laws
* (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/09/business/media/youtube-kids-ftc-complaint.html)
10:38 - Highlights from Zuckerberg Congress / House Hearing
18:05 - Russia Bans Telegram
* (https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/17/17246150/telegram-russia-ban)
20:00 - National Geographic Ebola mini-series
20:50 - Netflix Buying Movie Theaters? 
22:14 - Ask Bandrew
22:40 - Question 1
23:20 - What Headphones Provide the Least Listening Fatigue
25:35 - Question 2
25:45 - Thoughts on 368 Casey Nesitat & Patreon Jack Conte Meeting?
27:01 - Question 3
27:08 - What’s an Appropriate Age to Start Podcasting?
28:41 - Question 4
29:01 - How to Deal with Suicide?
* (https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/)

Submit your questions to be answered on a future episode to AskBandrew@gmail.com

The Bandrew Says Podcast is available on:
►iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bandrew-says-podcast-audio/id1046423132?mt=2
►Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/music/m/Ieua25h7tadlb2ti4p5nclqhjuu?t=The_Bandrew_Says_Podcast_Audio_Video__Tech
►RSS Feed: http://bandrewsays.libsyn.com

Follow us on:
► Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bandrewsayspodcast
► Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bandrewsays
► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com

Universal Audio Arrow Interface Review

Today I am reviewing an amazing new interface from Universal Audio, the Universal Audio Arrow.

During this review, I have the Rode NT1 connected directly to the Arrow, recording at 24-bit, 48kHz. I have done no post processing to the audio, but it was boosted ~6dB in Final Cut Pro to make it easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this interface, it will set you back $500.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Interface
  2. Quick Start Guide

Specifications

  1. Bit Depth: 24-Bit
  2. Sample Rate: 44.1 - 192kHz
  3. Gain Range: 10 - 65dB
  4. Dynamic Range: 118dBA
  5. EIN: -128dBu
  6. Input Impedance: 9.2K Ohms, 5.4K Ohms (with +48v engaged)
  7. Pad: -20dB
  8. Phantom Power: +48v
  9. Processing: Solo Core DSP Chip

Performance / Features

The build quality of this interface is great. It has an all aluminum chassis, and a foam/rubber bottom to keep the interface from sliding around your deck. The XLR and 1/4" inputs all feel firmly attached and do not wiggle around at all. The buttons and dials on the face of the interface also have nice tactile feedback and feel sturdy as well. If you would like to learn more about the functions of this interface, this is covered in the video review. 

The overall performance of this interface is amazing. First off, the preamps. You're getting up +65dB of gain, which is fully capable of driving even the most gain hungry microphones (like the SM7b). When I tested the noise floor, I measured it at around -110dB, which is very impressive at 100%. The A/D converters offer all you could possibly need by recording 24-bit up to 192kHz. While you're at 192kHz, you get roundtrip latency as low as 3ms, and output latency around .5ms.

The real stand out future of this interface is in it's processing and plugins. You get the same near zero latency monitoring/processing as mentioned before, but it's processed on the interface and not on your computer. The plugin pack that comes with the interface has some useful tools like the UA-610B tube preamp, Teletronics LA-2A, Marshall Plexi Classic, and Bass Amp emulator, but I actually bought a unison pre, and I used it on every podcast I recorded. That is the API Vision Channel Strip, paired with the LA-2A. There's not much more I can say about the performance of this thing. It is outstanding on all fronts, and I truly enjoyed using the device.

Pros

  • Live DSP Processing (Near zero latency)
  • Bus powered so there's no need for an external power supply
  • -110dB noise floor at 100%
  • Preamps have 65dB of gain
  • 24-Bit 192kHz High Res A/D convertors
  • 3ms roundtrip (.6ms output) latency at 192kHz
  • Great build quality
  • Offers full +48v phantom power on bus power

Cons

  • Expensive relative to other dual preamp interfaces
  • Steep learning curve for the routing software
  • Some software does not like this interface (discord)
  • Locked into thunderbolt 3

Conclusion

This is the perfect interface if you are looking to dive into Universal Audio's ecosystem without spending $1000 on an interface. If you're a musician who strictly records in the box, and can't afford expensive outboard gear, this is a great entry point to play with Universal Audio's top of the line analog emulation plugins to add color and life to your recordings. If you're a podcaster, I also think that this is an awesome option since you will get the chance to play with emulations of gear that podcaster's don't typically get a chance to use.

After two months of testing this thing, the plugins and live processing have become so essential for my podcasting workflow, and voice chat workflow, that I am not able to remove it from my desk. It has become a permanent staple in my recording system.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the Universal Audio Arrow
US: https://amzn.to/2HEPlc9
UK: N/A
CA: https://amzn.to/2He8BO6
DE: N/A

Buy the Rode NT1 Kit
US: http://amzn.to/2i1eWfO
UK: http://amzn.to/2i3uFh8
CA: http://amzn.to/2qzk3dz
DE: http://amzn.to/2FCzPsk

TPR-129: THE WAR FOR KALEB LIVESTREAM

Comic creator Jason Pittman returns to the podcast for a live stream of his Kickstarter graphic novel project, "The War for Kaleb: A Superhero Story about Anxiety." 

This episode was livestreamed on 4/11/18 at 7pm PST

Jason has created a 3 issue story and is collecting it into on fantastic book. On this episode we chat about the process of making comics, the ups and downs of Kickstarter and why we love makes comics and telling stories.

Send Your Questions to:

thepaperrobots@gmail.com

Follow:

JASON PITTMAN

GN.png

LOGAN NAUGLE

REFERENCED

  • Backpack Reviews
  • Drawing Comics the Marvel way

 

30176183_10209506686019058_1953489560_o.jpg

IK Multimedia iRig Mic Studio Review

Today I'm reviewing another microphone from IK Multimedia, iRig Mic Studio.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to my 2017 iMac with the input gain set at 10:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $150.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Microphone Mount
  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Stand Adapter
  4. Desktop Tripod Stand
  5. USB-A Cable
  6. Lightning Cable
  7. Micro-USB Cable
  8. Storage pouch
  9. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Sensitivity: ~-42dB
  4. Max SPL: 133dB
  5. Self-Noise: 11dBA
  6. Bit Depth: 24-Bit
  7. Sample Rate: 48kHz

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone doesn't give me anything to complain about. It has a metal body construction and a metal grill that feels sturdy. It is also a bit on the light side. These are all good attributes for a travel microphone. On the front you'll find a gain dial to adjust the microphone's gain, a multi-color LED light for metering, and a headphone volume control. Lastly, on the back of the microphone you'll find a 3.5mm headphone jack, which does not offer latency free monitoring.

The frequency response is listed as 20Hz - 20kHz. They do not have any frequency response published, but while listening to the audio samples it sounds as though this mic has a significant treble boost which gives it too much clarity, to the point that it starts to sound unnatural. Additionally, this mic has a rather prominent proximity effect, so if you mic any source closely, you will get a slightly scooped mid tone. 

The polar pattern of this mic is cardioid. It didn't do a good job at background noise rejection. There was a slight volume decrease as you move around the microphone, but the ambient noise, keyboard noise, guitar noise will be apparent in your recordings. 

The overall performance of this mic is fine, but I'm becoming pickier, and more curmudgeonly. First, the preamp is relatively quiet all the way up to 100%, the main noise introduced was ambient noise. The tone of this mic is overly bright, and this adds too-much clarity in my opinion which leads it to sound somewhat unnatural. As I already mentioned, if you mix this frequency response with the proximity effect, you will likely end up with a slightly scooped mid tone. Also when I compared this mics samples against flatter mics like the NT1, it had a minimal nasal tone.

Pros

  • Convenient since it's compatible with multiple OS (Mac, Windows, iOS, Android)
  • HD Recording (24-bit, 48kHz)
  • Relatively quiet preamp
  • Fairly good job at rejecting plosives

Cons

  • Overboosted treble frequncies
  • Lacks latency free monitoring
  • No specs included in documentation

Conclusion

This microphone is perfectly mediocre. Nothing really sticks out to me as a reason to buy it except for the almost universal compatibility. Other than that, I do not think that I can recommend it. This is mainly because the overly boosted high end leads to a unnatural tone which I am not a fan of.  I am also turned off by the lack of zero latency monitoring.

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the IK Multimedia iRig Mic Studio
US: https://amzn.to/2qF7X0O
UK: https://amzn.to/2HEi4v3
CA: https://amzn.to/2H8ig8U
DE: 

IK Multimedia iRig Mic HD Review

Today I'm reviewing an outdated microphone that has a newer model already released...the iRig Mic HD.

For this review, I have the mic connected directly to my 2017 iMac with the input gain set at 11:00. I have done no post processing on the audio, it is all raw, but the audio was slightly boosted in final cut pro X to simply make the audio easier to listen to.

If you are interested in this microphone, it will set you back $110.00 on Amazon

What's In the Box

  1. Microphone
  2. Microphone Mount
  3. 5/8" to 3/8" Stand Adapter
  4. USB-A Cable
  5. Lightning Cable
  6. Cable lock
  7. Storage pouch
  8. Documentation

Specifications

  1. Frequency Response: 40Hz - 18kHz
  2. Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  3. Max SPL: 134dB (3% THD)
  4. Bit Depth: 24-Bit
  5. Sample Rate: 48kHz

Performance / Features

The build quality of this microphone is sufficient. It has an all metal body and a sturdy feeling metal grill. It does feel a bit on the light side which makes me reluctant about the durability of this microphone's body. On one side you will find the microphone gain dial, and on the other side you will find a multi-color LED light which can be used for metering. 

The frequency response is listed as 40Hz - 18kHz. They do not have any frequency response published, but while listening to the audio samples it is apparent that this not as presence boosted as the majority of handheld dynamic microphones. 

The polar pattern of this mic is cardioid. The background noise rejection did not blow my socks off. At 90 / 270-degrees, there was almost no low frequencies; there was only treble. Once we got around the mic to 180-degrees, all the treble had been eliminated and the low end returned. 

The overall performance of this mic is a mixed bag. The tone of this microphone is pretty good (if you like flatter microphones). Because it is flatter it is more neutral, and is a bit more boring sounding. The preamp fairly quiet all the way up to 100%, but it is difficult to measure the actual noise floor since I do not have an anechoic chamber to test this in. On the other hand, it suffered significantly from plosives which could lead to ruined recordings. The handling noise was also pretty disappointing. 

Pros

  • Convenient since it's compatible with multiple OS (Mac, Windows, iOS)
  • HD Recording (24-bit, 48kHz)
  • Relatively neutral response compared to other handheld dynamics
  • Relatively quiet preamp

Cons

  • Lacks latency free monitoring
  • Suffers from plosives
  • Did not perform well with handling noise

Conclusion

If you are looking for a USB mic to run on your windows or mac computer, I would suggest you look somewhere else for a microphone. I say this because this microphone suffers so badly from plosives, it doesn't do well with handling noise, and it lacks latency free monitoring. Additionally the USB microphone market it very competitive so you can get a microphone that meets all your requirements for the same price if not cheaper.

On the other hand, if you're looking for a handheld dynamic microphone, that requires HD audio, has a relatively neutral frequency response, and runs to your iOS device over lightning cable, then your options are much more limited. I think in that case, this may be one of the only options you have, but i would suggest you check out the Mic HD 2 as it added the latency free monitoring, and hopefully they improved the plosive issue. 

If you have any additional questions about this microphone, leave them on the youtube video, and I will try to reply ASAP. 

Buy the IK Multimedia iRig Mic HD
US: https://amzn.to/2v9xvJ4
UK: https://amzn.to/2v6cDSY
CA: https://amzn.to/2EEZHDc
DE: https://amzn.to/2IN4RPW

Buy the IK Multimedia iRig Mic HD 2
US: https://amzn.to/2Hfgr9n
UK: https://amzn.to/2v7q2dn
CA: https://amzn.to/2EEGdhS
DE: https://amzn.to/2qqFZWt

 

TPR-128: PQ'S STYLE

This episode we breakdown what "Style" means to us as creators and humans. Joined by toy designer Cynthia Gerriets and artist, Vincent Kukua. Style is describes as "distinctive manner which permits the grouping of works into related categories" With a topic like this we could have chatted for hours but I think we touch on a little bit of everything and provided our opinions on what style means in a creative world.

Send Your Questions to:

thepaperrobots@gmail.com

Follow:

LOGAN NAUGLE

VINCENT KUKUA

  • IG:  @VKukua

CYNTHIA GERRIETS

  • IG: @tentimesatiger

REFERENCED

Follow us on:

► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepaperrobots

► Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paper_Robots

► Website: http://www.geeksrising.com